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strangefate

Tower of Iron Will

All who enter the Tower regain 100 sanity points.

Currently reading

Machine of Death: A Collection of Stories About People Who Know How They Will Die
Randall Munroe, James Foreman, K. Sekelsky, Camron Miller, John Chernega, David Michael Wharton, K.M. Lawrence, Jeffrey C. Wells, Vera Brosgol, Kit Yona, J. Jack Unrau, Jeff Stautz, Aaron Diaz, Matthew Bennardo, Yahtzee Croshaw, Douglas J. Lane, Brian Quinlan, Kate Beaton

Of Amazonian Bondage

Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 1 - Grant Morrison, Yanick Paquette

Wonder Woman must be one of the most difficult writing jobs in comics. Every writer who takes on the job feels obligated to start by retelling her origin story and introducing some twist of their own. In retelling WW's origin, Grant Morrison tries to recapture the very weird tone of early WW comics, and by weird I don't mean amusing weird, I mean disturbing weird.

 

The creator of WW was by all accounts really into bondage. His Amazons talk a lot about submission and enjoy getting tied up. That is why WW's primary weapon was a lasso and her original weakness was that she would loose her powers if a man chained her wrists. It can be read metaphorically, but it really comes across as fetishistic.

 

Even though Morrison's update tries to ironically wink at the reader and suggest we are all in on the joke, the attempt is misguided. Wonder Woman is an idea that has evolved far beyond its origins. Wonder Woman has become an iconic symbol of female empowerment that inspires woman and girls all over the world. Revisiting her embarrassing origin is a bad idea.